Helping people talk to each other

Over the coming months this blog will build further on the issues explored in my book ‘Rethinking Patient Safety’.

The aim is to help readers and anyone interested in helping people work safely to think about the simple things they can  do differently now.

The thread throughout that connects the blog, the forthcoming outputs and downloadable resources of Sign up to Safety and the twice monthly newsletter is our refined ‘throughline’ (*)

helping people talk to each other

The book still provides the detailed knowledge, latest thinking and descriptive stories related to how we might learn from and build on our work to date in relation to patient safety.  It also provides, for the change makers amongst you, lessons in social movements and campaigning together with how the Sign up to Safety campaign has evolved and matured over the last three years.

The forthcoming blogs will provide additional concepts, insights and ideas which will be linked to the next phase of the campaign.  They will provide practical ways in which people can behave and act as well as provide useful references and links to sources and resources which can help.  We are really looking forward to sharing our knowledge and that of others to truly help you work as safely as you can.

(*) there is a blog devoted to what a throughline is which was written on 8 September 2016 … a summary of which is….

A throughline for our campaign  is something we have adapted from guidance shared by Chris Anderson in his excellent book ‘TED talks, the official TED guide to public speaking’ .  It is a simple sentence of around 15 words which describes what you are trying to achieve.  In the case of TED talks – it should describe your presentation in around 15 words.  We adapted it to describe the strategic direction of the campaign so that we could use those 15 words (or less) to connect everything we do together and a way of creating a strong thread throughout all the elements of our work.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s