Month: August 2015

Patient Safety is hard

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Its time we stopped beating ourselves up.  Patient Safety or improving the safety of patient care is hard. In today’s world we have spell checkers and prompts to help us with difficult problems.  We have search engines which help us find the most obscure and wonderful facts and figures.  There are even designs that help us get things right; large handles to pull a door (rather than flat plates to push), cordless kettles, brakes and accelerator pedals […]

Nudge!

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I am currently reading ‘Nudge’ by Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein [Nudge: improving decisions about health, wealth and happiness].  I am hoping to pick up some tips which will help the campaign succeed. Apparently one of the most effective ways to ‘nudge’ people (help them make decisions good or bad) is via social influence.  One of the social influences they cite is peer pressure. We learnt a while back when delivering ‘patient safety first’ that peer […]

Sign up to Safety Strategy Year 2

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“We have tended to focus on problems in isolation, one harm at a time, and our efforts have been simplistic and myopic. If we are to save more lives and significantly reduce patient harm, we need to adopt a holistic, systematic approach that extends across cultural, technological and procedural boundaries – one that is based on the evidence of what works” [Darzi, A, (2015) Health Service Journal, The NHS safety record needs to be as […]

Innovation for the future NHS

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The diffusion of innovations or new technologies takes a long time. Currently we have fifteen Acadmic Health Science Networks who have been funded to set up patient safety collaboratives to tackle some intractable patient safety problems using innovation and improvement methods. However, it may be worth their while to try to imagine what society, social behaviour and attitudes are going to be in the future and how these will impact on the NHS and then […]

Confidence in the data

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Malcolm Gladwell of the ‘tipping point’ fame recently said that more data increases our confidence not our accuracy. If we look at what we know about harm and incident reporting are we growing more confident? I regularly look at the NRLS data and ask myself what it is actually telling me. I can see that the same types of incidents are reported year on year, and I can see that the numbers of reports increase […]